Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

Different drugs used in treatment of Stevens-Johnson syndrome

If you’re diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, according to the Mayo Clinic, you may receive one of the following varieties of medication currently being studied in the treatment of the condition:

Intravenous corticosteroids — For adults, intravenous corticosteroids may lessen the severity of symptoms and shorten recovery time if started within a day or two of the first appearance of symptoms. But they may also increase risk of complications for children.

Immunoglobulin intravenous (IVIG) — This medication contains antibodies that may help the ...

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Stevens Johnson Syndrome can cause lingering effects

Stevens-Johnson syndrome, which can cause the top layer of skin to shed and die, is a painful and potentially deadly condition usually caused by an allergic reaction to medication, infection or illness.

It requires hospitalization, frequently in an intensive care unit or burn unit. But according to the Stevens Johnson Syndrome Foundation, patients who suffer a bout may have to contend with the after-effects for a long time afterward – perhaps the rest of their lives.

Lingering side effects may include:

  • Permanent loss ...
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Hepatitis drug Incivek linked to Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning that the hepatitis C drug Incivek, manufactured by Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc., can cause serious and potentially deadly skin reactions.

Vertex has placed a “black box warning” – the most serious available – on the drug’s label, Reuters reports.

According to the Reuters story, skin rashes were already a known side effect of the drug. The warning came in response to an analysis of data collected since the drug was approved in the ...

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Treatment complicated for Stevens Johnson syndrome

The Mayo Clinic says doctors can frequently identify Stevens-Johnson syndrome based on medical history, a physical exam and the condition’s distinctive signs and symptoms. Doctors may also take a skin sample for examination under a microscope.

However it’s diagnosed, Stevens-Johnson syndrome is considered a medical emergency and requires hospitalization, frequently in an intensive care unit or burn unit. It’s usually an allergic reaction in response to medication, infection or illness, and can cause the top layer of skin to shed and ...

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How to prepare for Stevens Johnson Syndrome treatment

According to the Mayo Clinic, you may not have time to prepare for a doctor visit before seeking treatment for Stevens Johnson Syndrome.

The condition is usually an allergic reaction in response to medication, infection or illness, and can cause the top layer of skin to shed and die.

It’s considered a medical emergency, and you should call 911 or go to an emergency room if you have signs and symptoms.

But if you do have time before you go, the Mayo Clinic ...

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Secondary conditions accompany Stevens Johnson Syndrome

Stevens Johnson Syndrome in itself is an extremely serious and potentially deadly condition.

The condition is usually an allergic reaction in response to medication, infection or illness. It can cause the top layer of skin to shed and die, which is extremely painful for the patient.

But according to the Mayo Clinic, Stevens Johnson Syndrome can also bring a host of complications, including:

Secondary skin infection, or “cellulitis”: This acute infection of the skin can lead to life-threatening complications, including meningitis — an ...

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