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Diet and exercise program treats diabetics

An article in Forbes describes a diabetes treatment program from Omada Health, which is based on diet and exercise. Author Zina Moukheiber says the program has already yielded some astounding results for participants.

Omada co-founder Sean Duffy based the program on a 2002 study from the National Institutes of Health, which had 3,234 participants diagnosed with pre-diabetes go through a 24-week course of treatment.

Members of a group whose treatment consisted of a low fat and calorie diet, exercise and counseling reduced their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, compared to 31 percent for members of a group who took the Type 2 diabetes drug metformin twice a day.

Moukheiber points out that a drug with results like that would be a blockbuster. Yet Omada’s program, at $120 per month for four months, is far cheaper than many drugs prescribed for diabetes – some of which carry risk factors as well.

For example, studies have linked type 2 diabetes medications Byetta and Januvia to conditions including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Byetta has also been linked to an increased risk of thyroid cancer.

According to the article, Omada is launching an online program called Prevent, in which participants at risk of developing diabetes will enroll in a 16-week program that focuses on healthy eating and exercise.

They will be placed in groups of 10 to 12, based in part on their geographic location so they can team up with other participants and form a support network. Participants will also work with a “health coach,” who will track their progress and provide additional support.

You should consult with a doctor if you have any ongoing symptoms or health concerns, and before making any changes in medication. You should also consult with a Lopez McHugh attorney if you or a loved one was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer after taking Januvia or Byetta.

See the story here:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/zinamoukheiber/2012/12/11/if-this-diabetes-prevention-program-were-a-drug-it-could-be-a-blockbuster/